In the last two centuries, improvements in technology and health meant fewer children died young, fuelling rapid population growth. These large families produced even more buy paper online do my homework for me children who survived into adulthood and had their own children. But with the wider availability of contraception in the 1960s, the global average number of babies per woman has declined from six babies per woman to as low as two.

The biggest factor in child mortality is poverty. And while it’s still true that only 20 per cent of the world takes about 74 per cent of the world’s income, 60 per cent of the world now falls into a middle-income group, with 11.6 per cent – the smallest amount of people in history – still living in conditions of extreme poverty. If the majority of the world’s people have money, international aid could realistically achieve the UN target of eradicating poverty by 2030. As poverty buy paper online do my homework for me goes down, life expectancy goes up, birth rates go down because parents can expect their existing children to survive, and the global population stabilises.